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DESIGN YOUR WORLD!

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We know you have been spending more time closer to home these days and we know you feel the urge to beautify! So do we! Let us help.

Here are a few pieces Sue has recently made for the home and the garden.  Browse the new work and get inspired!  ( Garden Dress   )

And for those of you making commitments and renewing vows, now is the time to design your wedding, celebration, or commitment to your self or your love!  Arn is here to help with the design and creation of your heirloom piece. His work features eco metal, reclaimed and recycled ....and of such quality that it can be passed down for generations to come.  (Wedding Set

 

Conscious Creativity

We're dedicated to environmentally sound processes to create our ethically sourced jewelry. Each piece is made entirely by hand in our Warren Studio, using no outside manufacturing. We care deeply about preserving our natural resources. 

 

 

Aeris Comantem (Copper Blooming Vessel) 

One of Sue's new pieces, available now in our studio! A large sculpture made of hand knitted copper wire, with mesh petal like shapes draping gently from the top opening. 

Read more

DESIGN YOUR WORLD!

Posted by Arn Krebs on

We know you have been spending more time closer to home these days and we know you feel the urge to beautify! So do we! Let us help.

Here are a few pieces Sue has recently made for the home and the garden.  Browse the new work and get inspired!  ( Garden Dress   )

And for those of you making commitments and renewing vows, now is the time to design your wedding, celebration, or commitment to your self or your love!  Arn is here to help with the design and creation of your heirloom piece. His work features eco metal, reclaimed and recycled ....and of such quality that it can be passed down for generations to come.  (Wedding Set

 

Conscious Creativity

We're dedicated to environmentally sound processes to create our ethically sourced jewelry. Each piece is made entirely by hand in our Warren Studio, using no outside manufacturing. We care deeply about preserving our natural resources. 

 

 

Aeris Comantem (Copper Blooming Vessel) 

One of Sue's new pieces, available now in our studio! A large sculpture made of hand knitted copper wire, with mesh petal like shapes draping gently from the top opening. 

Read more


Mokume Gane~ A Symbolic Form of Marriage

Posted by Arn Krebs on

Mokume Gane~ A Symbolic Form of Marriage

The way that the rings are made, the uniqueness of the patterns...there are so many ways that Mokume Gane is the perfect art form to symbolize marriage, and even more incredibly.....it can be made into wedding rings

Read more

Mokume Gane~ A Symbolic Form of Marriage

Posted by Arn Krebs on

Mokume Gane~ A Symbolic Form of Marriage

The way that the rings are made, the uniqueness of the patterns...there are so many ways that Mokume Gane is the perfect art form to symbolize marriage, and even more incredibly.....it can be made into wedding rings

Read more


Mokume Talismans & Sculptural Forms

Posted by Arn Krebs on

Mokume Talismans & Sculptural Forms

Arn has been working on some unique Mokume Gane pieces. He has meticulously sculpted and formed these extremely rare creatures by hand. Complete with Sapphire and Ruby eyes and pattered scales and shells. These pieces will be entered into the Saul Bell competition next year. First preview here for our loyal customers! 

Sue has been exploring abstract forms as of late and has begun creating pieces for interiors and home decor clients.  Inspired by Iconic artist Ruth Asawa, Sue has taken her love of botanical and oceanic form and abstraction to heart. 

Read more

Mokume Talismans & Sculptural Forms

Posted by Arn Krebs on

Mokume Talismans & Sculptural Forms

Arn has been working on some unique Mokume Gane pieces. He has meticulously sculpted and formed these extremely rare creatures by hand. Complete with Sapphire and Ruby eyes and pattered scales and shells. These pieces will be entered into the Saul Bell competition next year. First preview here for our loyal customers! 

Sue has been exploring abstract forms as of late and has begun creating pieces for interiors and home decor clients.  Inspired by Iconic artist Ruth Asawa, Sue has taken her love of botanical and oceanic form and abstraction to heart. 

Read more


What Is Guribori & Mokume Gane? The Ancient and Modern History

Posted by Arn Krebs on

Guribori is generally thought to be the origin of Mokume-Gane. Guribori is the metalsmithing technique that involves alternating many different color metals and carving curves and spiral patterns inspired by lacquer work in China.

The modern story of Mokume Gane and Guribori involves the husband and wife team Eugene Michael Pijanowski and Hiroko Sato Pijanowski who brought Mokume Gane to the US in the early 1970's after learning the technique from ninth generation metalsmith Norio Tamagawa. There is rich history around Mokume Gane which could lead into many texts. Here is a brief overview of how Guribori came to be by Hiroko Sato Pijanowski & Gene Michael Pijanowski

They explained the history of Guribori in this published text which we will quote below and link to here© Hiroko Sato Pijanowski & Gene Michael Pijanowski

 "Mokume-Gane was innovated by Denbei Shoami (1651-1728), who lived and worked most of his life in Akita Prefecture of Northwest Japan. He was a superb craftsman who was given permission to use the name Shoami from Shoam School, which started in Kyoto in the late 1500's. He was also supported by Satake who was then Kaimyo (feudal lord) in the Akita area. Mokume-Gane was Shoami's invention, but it was only one facet of his work. It should be realized that he was also a historically important craftsman who produced excellent examples in steel, of sword furniture, and sword fittings with carving and inlay. At first, Shoami named his technique Guri Bori because the pattern on his first nonferrous Mokume-Gane tsuba was like Guri, which is one of the Tsuishu techniques in lacquer work (Urshi), originating in ancient China. Tsuishu is one of the techniques where patterns are achieved by carving into thick layers of different colored lacquer; when line patterns are created, it is referred to as Guri. From sword making influences Denbei Shoami found that nonferrous laminates could be joined together to create patterns similar to lacquer work. He later named this pattern Mokume-Gane. His oldest work in Mokume-Gane was used in the Kizuka (sword hilt) using gold, silver, Shakudo, and copper. This technique was also called Itame-Gane or Yosefuki. There is no doubt that Denbei Shoami was influenced by the swordsmith and adapted those principles of forge welding to begin Mokume-Gane."

 

Read more

Guribori is generally thought to be the origin of Mokume-Gane. Guribori is the metalsmithing technique that involves alternating many different color metals and carving curves and spiral patterns inspired by lacquer work in China.

The modern story of Mokume Gane and Guribori involves the husband and wife team Eugene Michael Pijanowski and Hiroko Sato Pijanowski who brought Mokume Gane to the US in the early 1970's after learning the technique from ninth generation metalsmith Norio Tamagawa. There is rich history around Mokume Gane which could lead into many texts. Here is a brief overview of how Guribori came to be by Hiroko Sato Pijanowski & Gene Michael Pijanowski

They explained the history of Guribori in this published text which we will quote below and link to here© Hiroko Sato Pijanowski & Gene Michael Pijanowski

 "Mokume-Gane was innovated by Denbei Shoami (1651-1728), who lived and worked most of his life in Akita Prefecture of Northwest Japan. He was a superb craftsman who was given permission to use the name Shoami from Shoam School, which started in Kyoto in the late 1500's. He was also supported by Satake who was then Kaimyo (feudal lord) in the Akita area. Mokume-Gane was Shoami's invention, but it was only one facet of his work. It should be realized that he was also a historically important craftsman who produced excellent examples in steel, of sword furniture, and sword fittings with carving and inlay. At first, Shoami named his technique Guri Bori because the pattern on his first nonferrous Mokume-Gane tsuba was like Guri, which is one of the Tsuishu techniques in lacquer work (Urshi), originating in ancient China. Tsuishu is one of the techniques where patterns are achieved by carving into thick layers of different colored lacquer; when line patterns are created, it is referred to as Guri. From sword making influences Denbei Shoami found that nonferrous laminates could be joined together to create patterns similar to lacquer work. He later named this pattern Mokume-Gane. His oldest work in Mokume-Gane was used in the Kizuka (sword hilt) using gold, silver, Shakudo, and copper. This technique was also called Itame-Gane or Yosefuki. There is no doubt that Denbei Shoami was influenced by the swordsmith and adapted those principles of forge welding to begin Mokume-Gane."

 

Read more


Shibuichi! Affordable Mokume Gane!

Posted by Arn Krebs on

ALL NEW, SHIBUICHI MOKUME GANE RINGS!
Arn has been experimenting in the studio to bring a low cost alternative to our mokume line for our customers who might need something more affordable in these tough times. 
He has cast and fabricated sheet stock of a traditional Japanese alloy of silver and copper called Shibuichi. Because of the silver content it won't etch away over time as copper typically does when laminated in a Mokume Gane billet. It is an EXTENSIVE Process! Just because it's copper and silver doesn't mean it's not a lot of work. We thought you would like to see the process and have attached process photos below of ALL THE STEPS! 
  This special alloy will allow our customers to have a low cost high quality alternative to typical Mokume Gane because there is no gold or palladium in these rings. We have named this metal combination "shadow" as this palette is lovely silver & grey tones and as always are made with Arn's gorgeous and unique patterns and amazing workmanship. If your budget and tastes allow you can add a red or yellow gold stratum layer, ridge line, or rails to create a color pop. The options are endlessness as we are one of the few Mokume Gane artist who create every ring custom every time. Let us know what you are interested in and choose your patterns and size for a custom quote ! 
 
 
 

Read more

Shibuichi! Affordable Mokume Gane!

Posted by Arn Krebs on

ALL NEW, SHIBUICHI MOKUME GANE RINGS!
Arn has been experimenting in the studio to bring a low cost alternative to our mokume line for our customers who might need something more affordable in these tough times. 
He has cast and fabricated sheet stock of a traditional Japanese alloy of silver and copper called Shibuichi. Because of the silver content it won't etch away over time as copper typically does when laminated in a Mokume Gane billet. It is an EXTENSIVE Process! Just because it's copper and silver doesn't mean it's not a lot of work. We thought you would like to see the process and have attached process photos below of ALL THE STEPS! 
  This special alloy will allow our customers to have a low cost high quality alternative to typical Mokume Gane because there is no gold or palladium in these rings. We have named this metal combination "shadow" as this palette is lovely silver & grey tones and as always are made with Arn's gorgeous and unique patterns and amazing workmanship. If your budget and tastes allow you can add a red or yellow gold stratum layer, ridge line, or rails to create a color pop. The options are endlessness as we are one of the few Mokume Gane artist who create every ring custom every time. Let us know what you are interested in and choose your patterns and size for a custom quote ! 
 
 
 

Read more